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Sunday, April 24, 2011

Marcia Clark writes novel "Guilt By Association" ~ Her first legal thriller since OJ Trial

Author Marcia Clark

*Please just take a moment to view this great video from Mulholland Books about "Guilt By Association"

Book Summary:
Los Angeles D.A. Rachel Knight is a tenacious, wise-cracking, and fiercely intelligent prosecutor in the city's most elite division. When her colleague, Jake, is found dead at a grisly crime scene, Rachel is shaken to the core. She must take over his toughest case: the assault of a young woman from a prominent family.

But she can't stop herself from digging deeper into Jake's death, a decision that exposes a world of power and violence and will have her risking her reputation--and her life--to find the truth.

With her tremendous expertise in the nuances of L.A. courts and crime, and with a vibrant ensemble cast of characters, Marcia Clark combines intimate detail, riotous humor, and visceral action in a debut thriller that marks the launch of a major new figure on the crime-writing scene.

Here's Marcia Clark being interviewed by George Stephanopolis  on Good Morning America

Who is the Author?
A former LA, California deputy district attorney, Marcia Clark is probably best known as the lead prosecutor in the O.J. Simpson murder case. She wrote a bestselling nonfiction book about the trial, Without a Doubt, and is a frequent media commentator and columnist on legal issues. She has appeared on such CNN programs as Nancy Grace. Ms Clark lives in Los Angeles.

My Review:

Honestly, as far as I'm concerned, Marcia Clark can do no wrong. I've always liked her spicey, "I can play with you big boys and win" attitude. She's funny and she's feisty. When I looked to read and review her new book "Guilt By Association," I was hoping I'd see some of Marcia coming through one of her characters. As always, Ms Clark doesn't fail us...

Rachel Knight is a committed DA and worthy protagonist in Clark's first legal suspense novel. She has all that sharp and edgy humor that kept us watching the irrepressible Ms Clark prosecute OJ Simpson against so many odds years ago. 

Rachel Knight is brilliant and formidable, and I like that combination for a woman. It's that unbeatable personality and character mix that makes for today's women who aren't afraid to make a difference and to take a stand against crime.  Rachel isn't just a good prosecutor, she's a lawyer with street smarts and sensitivity, as well as an instinct for the unsaid. The reader can feel her strength and empathy come through. Her sense of humor and witty cat-and-mouse bits make her thoroughly likable and real.

Clark's writing style is conversational and intelligent. It has an easy flow with a good deal of dialogue that brings the reader stealthily into the heart of the thriller.  As Rachel is caught up in the mystery, so are we. Reading along in this novel I felt like I had when I "rode shot gun" with Kinsey Milhone in her early novels...or when I research forensics with Patricia Cornwell. The flow of this novel is similar to both, actually. The easy way of involving and engaging the reader is of the same quality.

Marci Clark has the keen eye of a former prosecutor and legal advisor. She's clear about the problem, the issues and the details. It's apparent in her book. And, it's an element that makes one comfortable in the reading. 

"Guilt by Association" is a book to curl up with on a weekend. It's that good, and it's one you won't want to put down once you start it. Not so somber you'll make frown lines your botox treatments won't fix...not so gorey you'll forget food and fun...but just the right amount of mystery, suspense, thriller and new woman heroine you'll love!

As I said at the beginning of this review; I like Marcia Clark. I like that she's real and that she embraces her imperfections with a toss of her head and a gritty laugh. Just like Rachel Knight.  I like that both Marcia and her main characters have that touch of the indomitable spirit.

"Guilt by Association" is a book I recommend without question. This first book of Ms Clark's in this genre comes away with high marks.

For further information on "Guilt By Association" and a great interview of Ms Clark by a Boston reporter please visit:  http://www.mulhollandbooks.com/

Last Minute Tidbit!
Taken from the Mulholland Books site, this is a great question and answer put to Marcia:

Who are your 5 favorite women crime fighting characters?

Emma Peel (aka Diana Rigg) of “The Avengers”: Before it was cool to let women fight and carry guns, this woman did it all, and in a black cat suit no less.

Detective Chief Inspector Jane Tennison in “Prime Supect”: Jane is brilliant, tough, straight-talking; a woman who walked the walk without ever resorting to the cartoonish extremes of either trying to be a man or the outrageous coquette. And Helen Mirren is literally the only person who could play her.

Rita Fiore: The hottest female lawyer on two spectacular legs (thanks, Robert B. Parker!). She was Spencer’s “go-to” gal for all kinds of help and information. Every bit as predatory, tough and smart as any man, she and Spencer shared a perpetual, yet unrequited lust.

*My note: Many years ago in Wellesley, MA, I met Robert Parker and his ex-wife at one of those Mystery Dinners that were popular in the early 1990's. She and he were not married but shared the same house...she lived upstairs and he lived downstairs. They held hands and were a well-known "odd couple."  Parker told me that Rita was a composite of his wife who was a dark and sexy woman with long legs and a beautiful figure... She was taller and sexier than the teddy-bearish Mr. Parker. :]

Scully of the “X Files”: Cool as a cucumber, the rational, scientifically-minded counter-part to Mulder. Scully was a woman who could run without pin wheeling arms and wield a gun with believable authority. And, for a change, a woman was the logical, more emotionally balanced end of the team.

Nancy Drew: one of the earliest intrepid females and the heroine of my early childhood. In fact, she’s one of the reasons I wanted to be a thriller writer. At eighty years old (yep, eighty) she’s still out there crushing crime.

Please leave a comment for me! What do you think about Ms Clark's new venture into fiction writing?  Who are your favorite women crime fighters in fiction?


*Ms Clark's publisher is Mulholland Books, from which I received a reviewers copy. I have received no compensation for my review, nor have I been asked to write a favorable review. My opinions and remarks are honestly my own.


Helen's Book Blog

Yours is the second good review of this book I've seen and I have it on my NetGalley. Now I am even more motivated to read it, thank you!

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